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Who is Dr Climate?

Back in November 2006, I was a newly graduated physiotherapist. While all my friends were off finding jobs in hospitals and sports medicine clinics, I inexplicably enrolled in a Bachelor of Science. You see, during the final year of my physio studies, a friend of mine – who also happens to be an oceanographer – suggested that I read Tim Flannery’s bestseller, The Weather Makers. Ever since reading that book, I’ve been fascinated by the workings of the climate system.

After finishing my undergraduate studies for a second time, I worked at CSIRO for a few years developing regional climate projections for Australia and various Pacific island nations. I then completed a PhD at the University of Melbourne looking at Southern Hemisphere planetary waves (i.e. the winds in the upper atmosphere), before taking up a postdoc position at CSIRO to work on detection and attribution of ocean temperature and salinity changes. I have a strong interest in scientific computing and open science, so during my spare time I’m an instructor with Software Carpentry, write this blog about research best practice in the weather/climate sciences and help coordinate the Research Bazaar, which is a worldwide festival promoting the digital literacy emerging at the center of modern research. I’m also the current National Secretary of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society.

 

WHERE TO FIND ME

Email: irving.damien(at)gmail.com
Twitter: @DrClimate
Curriculum Vitae: here
Citation stats: ResearcherID
Code: GitHub
Networking: ResearchGate

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